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ODU Authors Get Double Exposure in Nature Geoscience

Having an article published in one of the Nature Publishing Group journals is a rare accomplishment for university faculty members across the globe, and it speaks well of the academic/research credentials of an author's institution.

This month, the journal Nature Geoscience is featuring two articles that have Old Dominion University scientists as authors. Both articles were released Sunday, Nov. 11, through the journal's advance online publication process and will be published in the print version of Nature Geoscience at a later date.

Dennis Darby, professor of ocean, earth and atmospheric sciences, is the lead author of an article reporting the discovery of a clear 1,500-year cycle in the Arctic Oscillation. This sheds light on climate trends elsewhere in the world. One of the co-authors is Chester Grosch, a professor of physical oceanography and computer science at ODU.

Peter Bernath, chair of the ODU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is one of the authors of an article reporting the first direct evidence that emissions of carbon dioxide caused by human activity are propagating upward to the highest regions of the atmosphere.

"This is a fine accomplishment, having two papers by scientists from Old Dominion published simultaneously by this prestigious journal," said Chris Platsoucas, dean of the ODU College of Sciences. "We are immensely proud of the work of professors Darby, Grosch and Bernath, and we congratulate them on these publications."

Nature Geoscience is an international monthly journal that is one of the sister publications of the weekly journal Nature. The Nature Publishing Group is headquartered in London, England.

Darby Team Finds Climate Evidence in Arctic Sea Sediments

A team of scientists led by Old Dominion University geological oceanographer Dennis Darby reports this week in an article slated for publication in the journal Nature Geoscience that it has identified for the first time a clear 1,500-year cycle in the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the surface atmosphere pressure pattern in the far north that greatly influences weather in the Northern Hemisphere. ( More )

Bernath Research Shows Manmade Pollution in Upper Atmosphere

A team of scientists including Peter Bernath, the chair of Old Dominion University’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, has reported the first direct evidence that emissions of carbon dioxide caused by human activity are propagating upward to the highest regions of the atmosphere. ( More )